Oftentimes, our homes can give all families, but especially women, the sense of security and financial means to move forward with their goals instead of remaining in a seemingly endless pattern of struggling.

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AuthorShaughnessy Miller

Our team in Haiti completed its 95th home this week. The recipient of our home, Yvonne Poteau, experienced tragedy and the neighborhood came together to begin building a home, but ran out of resources. That is when they turned to Homes from the Heart to help them complete the job.

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AuthorShaughnessy Miller

Guerda Charles is the recipient of Homes from the Heart's 94th home completed last week in Haiti. Guerda has been taking care of her grandchildren ever since the death of their mother in the earthquake.

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AuthorShaughnessy Miller

Philogène "Nène" Edner is 56 years old and has always lived in the dirt house pictured below with his four children and one grandchild. The home is make shift and requires Nène to use buckets to catch leaking rain water. He has continued to raise those children after the loss of his wife in earthquake.

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AuthorShaughnessy Miller

Carline Joseph has three kids. She is a farmer. And she has lived in this house made of dirt since the earthquake. She had been unsuccessfully been fighting to get government housing for years. When she heard about Homes from the Heart, she reached out immediately. 

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AuthorShaughnessy Miller

They say families that pray together, stay together. I would add that families who serve together, stay together.

With a last name like Miller, we could have been just about any run-of-the-mill family. It's easy to become a family that spends hours in front of separate television sets and falls into their own busy routines. Prioritizing family time is difficult. My family has found a way to make it work through the years and state lines that have attempted to divide us. A key component of that has been our shared focus on giving of ourselves to the community.

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AuthorMeghan Sullivan

Few people in El Salvador have been more committed to helping the poor than Archbishop Oscar Romero. This Saturday, Pope Francis will beatify Romero in what is expected to be one of the largest ceremonies in El Salvador's history.

Salvadorans' love for Romero is well-earned. During his time as Archbishop, El Salvador was entering into a time of civil war and extreme violence. He served, often alone, as a voice for the voiceless, defending the rights of the poor. 

It seems providential that even as Romero is being beatified, we have been invited to honor him at The Romero Community, building homes for families in severe poverty. For ten years, the community fought to receive the rights to their land, and their persistence has finally paid off. The President himself presented land titles to residents of the community last week in a ceremony full of grateful tears and smiles. Romero's legacy remains with the people of El Salvador, with the poor, and we are humbled and blessed to be a part of this redemptive story.

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AuthorMichael Bonderer

Perhaps you saw one of the many articles this January on what's been accomplished (or hasn't been accomplished) in Haiti since the 2010 earthquake. Haiti's recovery is anything but simple. However, there are proven methods that have worked, and which we continue to use, rebuilding Haiti one home at a time.

To know where we've come though, we should first consider where we started.

In 2010, a massive earthquake left over 2 million Haitians homeless. The earthquake destroyed or damaged roughly 250,000 homes.

As the poorest country in the Western hemisphere, and with little infrastructure to begin with, the nation was unprepared to respond. International Aid agencies rushed to the scene, providing much needed medical care, food, and temporary shelter. However, as is often the case with natural disasters, the ruckus fades on news stations and the next big disaster beckons our attention elsewhere.

Maculla Milien, like many of the Haitians that came through the 2010 earthquake, has known great loss. Her house, her husband, and her son, all were stolen from her in one cruel disaster. However, she didn't give up. She picked up the pieces and kept moving, supporting herself and her remaining children by buying goods that she could resell at the market. The tent pictured below provided meager shelter for the family as they continued to hope for a change.

Today, Maculla's hopes have turned into realities.  She and her family live in a sturdy, dry, earthquake-resistant home complete with the bright colors and inviting front porch that are characteristic of Haitian culture.  Not every loss can be restored, but this miracle, as Maculla calls it, can bring one family closer to healing and happiness.  Their thanks and prayers are given to all who made this new home a reality.

“All in for Christ, family, communities, and selfless service to humanity worldwide.” In his own words, that was how Rick summed up his life, and he certainly lived it. Richard A. “Rick” Dye was a board member of Homes from the Heart for two years, until his recent passing on May 29th at the age of 52.

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AuthorMeghan Sullivan